Here’s 6 reasons why a budget is your most powerful tool!

Did you know that according to the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada, less than half (46%) of Canadians have a budget, yet the vast majority (93%) of those who do budget stay within it most of the time. What does this mean for you? It means that if you put in the effort to start a budget, you will probably stick to it. It also means you can feel more confident about your future – a budget can completely change your financial destiny.

infographic - 6 reasons why budgeting is your most powerful tool

The low-down on down payments

Buying a house

Recently, we discussed things you need to be aware of when buying a home – I want to talk specifically about the various options to building your savings for the all-important down payment.

Let’s say you’re a young adult, just establishing your savings plan – with the ultimate goal of, one day, owning a home. The minimum requirement for a down payment is 5% (*The minimum down payment requirement for mortgage loan insurance depends on the purchase price of the home. For a purchase price of $500,000 or less, the minimum down payment is 5%. When the purchase price is above $500,000, the minimum down payment is 5% for the first $500,000 and 10% for the remaining portion. Mortgage loan insurance is available only for properties with a purchase price or as-improved/renovated value below $1,000,000), with Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) insuring your Mortgage.

There are a few ways of going about saving this money – I’d recommend using a Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) or Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA). Each have unique costs and benefits.

 

RRSP Savings and the Home Buyers Plan – If you are currently, or have considered contributing to an RRSP, there is a program designed to allow you to withdraw up to $25,000 from the plan (without penalty) to put towards a down payment. The plan requires that you repay the amount back to the plan, just as if you borrowed it. If you don’t make repayments over the allowed 15 year period, you would claim 1/15th of the withdrawal as income in the given tax year.

What I like best about this strategy is, you take advantage of your smart investment moves and open an opportunity for another investment. This plays very well into long-term building of your net worth and, if your employer is making matching contributions to your RRSP, you can quickly build up your savings balance.

Running short on your RRSP contributions? It might be worth considering an RRSP investment loan to catch up on unused contribution room. The increased contributions can drastically reduce your taxable income and yield a larger tax refund.

A really smart move would be to contribute that tax refund to your loan – or, contribute the refund to your RRSP’s.

More information on the Home Buyers Plan can be found on the Canada Revenue Agency website: http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/hbp/

 

Tax-Free Savings – Similarly to RRSP’s the interest earned on any deposits in your TFSA are exempt from taxation – meaning, your hard earned dollars will receive interest and you will not need to claim the returns as income. Withdrawals from the plan are very simple – there are no penalties, and the funds can move freely from the plan to your down payment without filling out any extra paperwork.

You cannot, however re-contribute the money taken from the TFSA until the following calendar year. And, there is no additional tax benefit for contributing money to your TFSA.

While the TFSA is a great investment vehicle for short or long-term investing; I am of the firm belief that, when it comes to down payments for first time buyers – it’s best to take advantage of the Home Buyers Plan mentioned above.

red piggy bank

So, you may be asking yourself, what if I don’t have an RRSP or a TFSA and I’m not very good about saving money – what else could I do?

Well, some Mortgage companies, Banks and Credit Unions will offer a personal loan for your down payment – but I’d caution against this. In addition to making payments for the Mortgage, Property taxes, heat/utilities, insurance – you’re also going to have to make an additional loan payment. If your budget can sustain this – by all means, it’s worth looking into further.

Alternatively, you could also venture in the direction of having a gifted down payment from a family member or really good friend (and trust me, they’d be a very good friend if they are willing to give you money to buy a house). This is becoming more of a norm in the home buying market. With house prices rapidly increasing in the region, you may feel like you’ll be playing a game of cat and mouse – your savings grows, but the price of housing grows too. So, sometimes having Mom and Dad or a grandparent help out, is a great hand up.

 

Here are some great links to CMHC’s website for more information and tools:

CMHC – Homebuying Step by Step: http://www.cmhc.ca/en/co/buho/hostst/index.cfm

CMHC – Ready, Set, Home App: http://www.cmhc.ca/en/co/buho/buho_018.cfm

** Ready Set Home is a tool to help homebuyers, especially first-time homebuyers, make informed choices when buying a home. Ready Set Home offers tools to guide you to figure out how much you can comfortably afford to spend as well as keep track of all the details during your home buying process.

Buying a Home: 6 things you need to do before closing the deal [Infographic]

6 important items on your home buying checklist!

Let’s face it, while buying a new home is exciting, it can also be extremely stressful. This infographic breaks down 6 important items you’ll need to check off your list before closing day.

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Things to consider when planning your wedding

BlissCouple2

24 years after our own wedding, my husband and I are now celebrating the weddings of children of our friends and relatives. In fact, as I’m writing this article, we are getting ready to attend the wedding of our niece later today! I expect that in the next 10 years we will be going to a lot of ceremonies (including, possibly, those of our own kids!). I recently came across this simple Wedding Budget Worksheet from one of my favorite financial writers, Gail Vaz-Oxlade, and I thought it would be well worth sharing with our readers. The worksheet is interactive, so make sure to click on the link to go directly to Gail’s webpage.

 

Wedding Budget Worksheet

wedding budget